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ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
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Hoists for Electric Scooters/Wheelchairs
Accrington Lancashire BB5 1QG Tel 01254 871599 Fax ... Website: http://www.elap.co.uk / Electric Mobility Euro ... of the boxed carrier for manual/folding electric wheelchairs more details
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Hoists for Electric Scooters/Wheelchairs
Wheelchair and electric scooter storage equipment ... Accrington Lancashire BB5 1QG Tel 01254 871599 Fax ... Website: http://www.elap.co.uk / Electric Mobility Euro ... more details
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Mobility Scooter Repair Accrington
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EXCLUSIVE A DISABLED mother-of-three who can barely walk is appealing to the person who stole her electric wheelchair to tell the police where it is. more details

Is it hard to work out which class you belong to if you\'re disabled?
A couple drinking champagne with a Rolls Royce in shot.

The BBC has published the results of a survey on the nation's class. Its basis is that the old class system - lower, middle and upper - is no longer relevant.

Previously class was strictly determined by occupation, wealth and education, but this new method suggests it's more relevant to categorise people by economic, social and "cultural capital" indicators.

Particularly relevant to the disability experience is that you may be a different kind of person to what your income, education, occupation or housing suggests.

You could be unemployed, you may consider yourself unemployable, but you may have a masters degree, enjoy opera and hang out with CEOs and surgeons. if that's you, then what defines your class?

Disability campaigner Kaliya Franklin tweeted earlier that she is not sure what class she belongs to. She says she is: "Middle class by upbringing & education but underclass due to benefit receipt?".

After taking the new class calculator test on the BBC website, Spoonydoc Tweeted that she ended up in the lowest class grouping: "I was precariat. Test very skewed by being housebound. Changed to emergent service worker otherwise."

What is class anyway?

Well, it's all about your essence and standing, your station in life, your status, your regardability, your power. It gives clues as to what kind of consumer you are, what your politics might be, and all sorts of other unsumuppable traits. If you can be pigeonholed, you can be broadly understood as a person or householder, and targeted accordingly by those who need to know: advertisers, political canvassers, statisticians, town planners, who knows what.

Many disabled people take a non-standard route through life. It's recognised that opportunities in education or employment are harder to achieve due to physical accessibility or barriers that are attitudinal. Disabled people are likely to have less money as a result of having fewer opportunities.

If you don't generate your own economic capital due to not having a regular job, the influences around you are perhaps more important in turning you into the person you are. This survey recognises that and it calculates your "cultural capital" i.e. what TV, newspapers, arts and events you are a consumer of.

Could you, or should you, be summed up by what you like? Rather than what you're like? Should we define disabled people by what's going on in their head rather than their bank balance? And is that power?

There are, of course, plenty of disabled people for whom disability has been no barrier to socio economic progress ... but it's not clear quite how many that is.

What class are you and why? What can you add to this discussion? Leave a comment or contact us via Twitter and on Facebook.


Publ.Date : Wed, 03 Apr 2013 14:14:34 +0000

Limbless Irish teen doesn\'t wish to inspire, she wants to be famous
Joanne O'Riordan writing, with a pen wedged between her chin and her shoulder

As St. Patrick's Day approaches, Emma Tracey speaks to Joanne O'Riordan, a disabled 16 year-old who is a household name back in Emma's home country, Ireland.

I first saw Joanne on Irish television 16 years ago. She was just a baby and her parents did the talking but it knocked my teenage socks off. Bursting with pride for their little girl with no limbs, the O'Riordans left chat show host Pat Kenny in no doubt of their high expectations for her future. Now she's well into her teens and has minor celebrity status with the nation seeing her regularly speak about disability matters.

Her image is relentlessly positive so I ask about what she finds difficult. "It's the fact I can't do things for myself. Now that I'm getting older, I want my hair and makeup done. The other night, before going to a party, I had to wait for my sister Gillian to come over and do it.

"It is frustrating that it causes problems for me if I'm left alone for even five minutes. I can't just do my own thing. I can't just throw myself on the couch and get the remote myself."

These negatives don't colour who she is though and what she wants to achieve.

After that early television appearance I didn't hear of Joanne O'Riordan again until she hit the headlines in Ireland just over a year ago. I remembered her parents determination and wasn't surprised when I saw that she had turned into a rather feisty individual.

The country's leader, Enda Kenny (no relation to the TV presenter), broke a promise he had personally made to Joanne on the election trail. Anxious about her future independence, she had actively sought reassurance from him and He told her that he wouldn't cut disability benefits to young people if he won. But in his very first budget after winning the election, that's exactly what he did cut.

Joanne's subsequent open letter of disappointment in the Irish Examiner newspaper gained a lot of attention and a video of that broken promise to her emerged and went viral. The government did a U-turn.

"I thought it would be just one more protest that would be swept under the carpet", Joanne tells me, "a one day thing, a one hit wonder". But her public dismay had made waves. Visually striking and a good talker, Joanne had captured the hearts of the Irish people, creating a real buzz on social media.

Just days after her letter was printed, Joanne was invited to be a guest on one of Ireland's most watched programmes, The Late Late Show. It was this appearance that made her a household name in Ireland. Displaying a great sense of humour she told host Ryan Tubridy about taking the unlikely role of nurse in her school play even though she has no arms or legs before then asking for his job - she said she could do it better than him.

Joanne O'Riordan meets boy band One Direction

Joanne loves to meet famous people

She currently attends a small secondary school where she is well respected but next year Joanne plans to enter the far bigger world of university to study journalism. Her mum is her primary carer currently but Joanne says she wouldn't want her there all the time: "There has to be a bit of craic... but I will probably live at home."

In April 2012, she spoke at a Girls in ICT event at the UN Headquarters in New York about the role technology plays in her life. At the end of her speech, she asked the boffins in the audience to create her a robot to give her full independence. Technologists at MIT and Apple took this seriously and have visited Joanne in Ireland to better understand her needs.

Joanne uses technology every day. She has a laptop for school and homework but tells me that she's addicted to her iPhone. "Depending on my mood that day, I'll work the phone using my top lip, nose, bottom lip, chin or my little left arm, what the doctors call a tree stump.

"To type on a keyboard, I clench a pen between my teeth and I stab the keys."

Joanne says she can type 36 words a minute and admits it "probably looks hilarious, my head bopping up and down at a hundred miles per hour".

She won the 2012 Irish Young Person of the Year award and her public profile will likely rise when a documentary about her is released later this year though it's fair to say she's probably already Ireland's most famous disabled person.

Her brother Steven has made the film; he is a successful documentary maker in his own right but is still mostly referred to as Joanne O'Riordan's brother.

Joanne enjoys her celebrity and admits she and Steven want different things from the film. "It is an uplifting documentary," says Joanne. "People are supposed to come out of it feeling like they can go and climb Everest. Steven has brilliant ideas of winning Oscars... but I just want to be the next Kim Kardashian."

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Publ.Date : Fri, 15 Mar 2013 12:31:39 +0000


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