Our listed vendors are mostly independent suppliers of excellent sensible mobility equipment like mobility scooters, motorized wheel chairs, rise and recliner chairs, adjustable beds, bathing, stair lifts and everyday living aids. We will assist with your complete mobility needs. For help with Electric Wheelchair Bath needs consider exploring the local businesses listed.


MOBILITY SHOP ONLINE

Home  Blog


Mobility Scooters
Wheelchairs
Electric Wheelchairs
Stairlifts
Electric adjustable Beds
Rising Chairs
Bath Lifts
Walking Frames



[Valid RSS]

Electric Wheelchair Bath Local Listings

Wheelchairs Bristol, Power Wheelchairs Bath, Ramps Cardiff
We sell many types of mobility aids including wheelchairs and power wheelchairs. We even sell Shoprider and Rascal scooters and ramps to allow easy vehicle access. Covering Bath, Bristol and Cardiff more details
Mobility Scooters, Powerchairs, Electric Wheelchairs ...
Mobility scooters UK - Motability specialists providing mobility scooters, powerchairs and electric wheelchairs to the UK and worldwide. Our huge range includes used motability scooters, electric scooters, wheelchairs, scooters for sale and much more more details
Manual and Electric Hire around the UK
Manual wheelchairs, commodes, stair lifts, bath lifts etc… Can provide a delivery ... web : www.bridgendwheelchairhire.co.uk. Hire out Commodes, electric wheelchairs, manual ... more details
Mobility Scooters, Wheelchairs, Mobility Aids & Disability ...
ElectricalMobilityScooters.co.uk - Mobility Scooters and a huge range of quality mobility mobility products such as stairlifts, scooters and electric mobility scooters. more details
Mobility Wheelchairs | Folding Wheelchairs | Lightweight ...
Mobility Experts are a leading supplier of rise and recline chairs in the UK. Mobility wheelchairs are the most common disabled living aid. Wheelchairs are ... more details
Mobility Scooters For Sale | Electric Wheelchairs | Riser ...
Universal Mobility offer exceptional value on mobility scooters, electric wheelchairs, riser recliner chairs, bathlifts and stairlifts for sale. We are the leading mobility supplier in a wide area around Milton Keynes and Luton for mobility scooters more details
Mobility Rentals for scooters, wheelchairs, beds, hoists ...
Mobility equipment Rentals: independence, peace of mind plus cost effective high quality patient care equipment rental, direct to individual homes or nursing care homes more details
Discount Mobility Shop | Mobility Scooters | Wheelchairs ...
Discount Mobility Shop - UK Leading Provider of Mobility Scooters, Wheelchairs, Bath Lifts, Rise Recine Chairs and all Quality Mobility Aids at Low Prices more details
Electric Wheelchair Colchester, sales, service and accessories.
... wetrooms UK, Power Chair Demonstration / Assessment,Mobility scooters UK,Powerchair specialists UK, Disabled bathroom adaptations uk,Lightweight Wheelchairs UK,electric ... more details

Ouch\'s new channel on Audioboo

We're making it easier for you to delve into Ouch

As well as the blog, we do a monthly internet radio programme. And now we're posting clips of the programme to a new channel we've got on Audioboo.

Here are three items taken from the talk show that you can click and listen to right now:

See my "bed life", see the whole me - an interview with artist Liz Crow who was about to spend two days and nights exhibiting herself in bed, being the disabled person she is when she's not putting a brave face on things out in public. She also talks about standing on the fourth plinth at Trafalgar Square dressed as a Nazi to highlight the disability holocaust in World War II.

Winter Paralympics: What do you know about the Games? Anything? (fact burst) - Just as it says on the tin. Rob and Liz fire questions at Tony Garrett about the colder non-London games ahead of us in 2014. If you know nothing about them, this'll bring you up to speed - quickly.

"Disabled people don't exist in a vacuum." DLA changes could have knock on effects for others - Broadening-out the benefit change debate, blogger Emma Round (Pseudo Deviant) and stickman cartoonist Hannah Ensor discuss how they spend their benefits and who it will affect if their money is reduced or taken away, includes taxi drivers and local businesses.

We're regularly adding new clips from the programme and will bring you more audio in the future.

Click, listen and share. Audioboo is a social networking site for playing and sharing audio, and having discussions around it.

You can follow Ouch! on Twitter and on Facebook.


Publ.Date : Mon, 15 Apr 2013 14:12:34 +0000

Lying on a sound box: deaf children listen to music

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.


The National Orchestra of Wales has been staging unique workshops and concerts for deaf people. Radio 4 reporter Andrew Bomford discovers children listening to music in a very physical way and speaks to those behind it. Here he blogs about his emotional day.

I'll admit that I am a bit weepy sometimes. I cried at the end of Les Miserables, so the moment that the Welsh National Orchestra string section got started, and Katherine Mount stood there, signing and singing to her profoundly deaf - but clearly enraptured - ten year old son Ethan, I wasn't surprised to feel myself choking up again.

Watch Katherine Mount singing Ethan's Song on YouTube

It was towards the end of a long, joyful, but emotionally draining day with the orchestra and children from The Ysgol Maes Dyfan special school in Barry near Cardiff. Some of them are almost completely deaf and others have serious hearing problems, but the joy and enthusiasm shown by the children in their appreciation of the music they were experiencing was wonderful to see.

This was part of an outreach programme by the National Orchestra of Wales which has seen members of the orchestra regularly working with school children on musical improvisations, as well as the simple joy of making music. It was all culminating in a series of five free concerts for schools and the general public, taking part in Cardiff over the last couple of days.

So how does that work then, you might wonder? Music for deaf people? It doesn't seem to make a lot of sense.

"Music can just affect people - there is an emotional connection," said Andy Everton, an Outreach Officer for the national orchestra, and himself a trumpet player, "I really don't think you have to hear it in order to appreciate it. There is an emotional connection which just happens."

Andy tells a story about going into a school and seeing a severely disabled deaf child who seemed to be incapable of any contact at all with anyone. He stood behind her playing the trumpet (with the sound dampened) and to everyone's amazement saw her reaction as she moved her eyes to follow the music wherever he went. It was the first time anyone had seen her make any kind of connection to the outside world.

Other children from the school just jumped at the opportunity to simply bang a drum, hold the bass clarinet or the harp as it was played, and to feel the curious sensation of the sound waves moving through their bodies via their sense of touch.

A deaf boy lies on a sound box hooked to a piano

The orchestra has also come up with an ingenious solution to the question of how deaf children can experience music.


They've built sound boxes - large wooden platforms, with heavy speakers inside them, which play the music, and are especially effective with the low frequency sounds, in a way that resonates sound through whatever part of the body is in contact with the box.

I saw deaf children sitting on the boxes, touching them with their hands, and even lying fully prone on them, with huge grins on their faces as they felt the vibrations of the music (You can see an explanation of this in the above video). Two deaf boys, Ethan (a different Ethan) and Ashley from Maes Dyfan school stood on the sound boxes and belted out a rap tune they'd improvised with the accompaniment of the orchestra.

"When they use the microphone they can feel their voices from the box and through their feet," explained Andy Pidcock, a keyboard player who's done a lot of work with deaf children, "They can feel everything they're doing and they can feel the beat." I tried it out myself - it was a fascinating sensation; somewhat similar to the thud of loud bass you can sometimes feel in your chest at a very loud concert.

The orchestra's work has been championed by the charity Music and the Deaf, run by Paul Whittaker. "This is the only occasion when an orchestra has done a fully integrated project for deaf people," Paul said, "Normally an orchestra might go into a deaf school or work with a group of deaf children. They might go to a concert where they sit and watch what goes on. Here it's fully participatory. They come and sit with the orchestra and take part."

But, as mentioned earlier, the tear-jerker of the night was certainly Katherine Mount's beautiful performance of "Ethan's Song". With a gorgeous show-tune style melody, it was written by Katherine's friend Helen Goldwyn, who was inspired after watching Ethan experiencing a music concert.

The song asks lots of fundamental questions about what the 10-year-old deaf boy is thinking and feeling as he connects to his mother through music:

What do you hear inside your head? Music, your music. I know I feel joy when sound connects to feeling, When the vibration meets the air.

"She was able to write the words of the song," recounted Katherine, "And when I heard them for the first time I was absolutely blown away that she'd managed to hit the nail on the head and express exactly what I'd been thinking for all those years."

You can follow Ouch! on Twitter and on Facebook.


Publ.Date : Wed, 27 Feb 2013 09:02:07 +0000


Did you know there are at least two cities in America called Bath?
Bath-Maine-mobility | Bath-New-York-mobility

Site Map