Our listed vendors are mostly independent distributors of high quality competitively priced mobility devices like mobility scooters, electric wheelchairs, rise and recliner chairs, adjustable beds, bathing, stair lifts and daily life aids. We can assist with all of your mobility requirements. For help with Electric Wheelchair Walsall needs consider exploring the local businesses listed.


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Electric Wheelchair Walsall Local Listings
Electric Wheelchair For Sale
With hundreds of used scooter west midlands electric wheelchairs for sale from nearly new to really old, Preloved is packed with second hand bargains. Sell your own scooter west midlands electric wheelchair quickly and easily by placing your own free more details
TGA Mobility Scooter Spares or Project …in WALSALL ...
£9.99 (0 Bid) End Date: Tuesday Oct-20-2009 11:51:56 BSTBid now | Add to watch listVisit merchant more details
Mobility in Walsall - Mobility Services in Walsall (UK)
Mobility Equipment and Services in in Walsall, including Mobility Scooters, Wheelchairs, Rise and Recline Chairs, Electric beds and much more from ABC Mobility. Please read our Customer Reviews and Testimonials. How can we help? more details
Firmcare Mobility: Mobility Scooters in Walsall
Searching for mobility scooters in Walsall? Firmcare Mobility offers the services you need. more details
Orange Badge Mobility - Folding Walsall Trolley
Largest mobility showroom in Sussex for mobility scooters, wheelchairs, stairlifts, riser recliners, walk in baths & showers. Free brochure, free home surveys and delivery. more details
Enigma Power Chair Electric Wheelchair | eBay
Enigma Power Chair Electric Wheelchair in Health Beauty , Mobility, Disability Medical , Mobility Equipment , Wheelchairs |eBay more details
Mobility Equipment in Walsall
Business listings for Mobility Equipment in Walsall. Includes: Class 2 Mobility Scooters,Class 3 Mobility Scooters,disabled access,disabled lifts,Electric Wheelchairs,Mobility Access Ramps,Mobility Accessories,Mobility Equipment,Mobility S more details
Mobility Scooters Walsall
Save money with discounted Mobility products online. Excellent service, nationwide delivery. Top Brands. All accessories and supporting services. Mobility Scooters Walsall. more details
Ledger Mobility - Batteries for Scooters and Electric Wheelchairs
Ledger Mobility supply batteries all shapes and sizes of mobility scooters, wheelchairs and stairlifts. Backed by our service and repair specialists, we look after our customers. more details


Updated : Thu, 18 Apr 2013 14:34:08 +0000

Goodbye - Ouch is on the move

This is the last entry on our page here. As of Thursday our blog will move to a new home, with a fresh format. Visit our new page to keep up with our stories and podcasts all in one place.

While this version of Ouch will no longer be updated, it will stay here for reference. Thanks for reading, and we look forward to keeping the conversation going in our new home.

We may have moved but the address bbc.co.uk/ouch will still take you to our latest stuff, now part of the News site.

See you in the new place.

Ouch Team

PS: Before 2011, Ouch had yet another home and a slightly different remit at the BBC. You can see even older archive dating back to 2002 which includes comedy, cartoons, video and columns.


Publ.Date : Thu, 18 Apr 2013 14:34:08 +0000

Katherine Kowalski: Life with Lawrence, whose syndrome has no name

No-one knows why two-year-old Lawrence lives with multiple disabilities.

To mark the inaugural Undiagnosed Children's Awareness Day on 13 April, mum Katherine Kowalski writes about her son's SWAN (syndrome without a name).

For most parents, life with a two-year-old involves hours of chasing a small person around, kicking balls, building towers, man-handling temper tantrums, breezily ignoring food fads and running the gauntlet of potty training. But even if you don't love your toddler's terrible twos, you can rest easy, pretty sure that they are on their way to becoming an independent little being.

Life with Lawrence is different. We don't know whether he will ever learn to crawl or feed himself, let alone walk, talk or live independently. We don't even know whether he will see adulthood. And we don't know why.

Lawrence was born healthy but is now what doctors call "complex". It became clear early on that he wasn't developing at the same rate as his peers and before we knew it we were on a roller coaster of investigative medical assessments and tests to find a cause.

His brain, heart and kidneys have been scanned. He's endured chest x-rays, chromosome testing, repeated and inconclusive eye and hearing tests and invasive surgery. And he's also spent time in the High Dependency Unit for seizures that caused him to stop breathing.

But despite the medical profession's best efforts, Lawrence's genetic syndrome remains nameless, categorised only by a very long (and expanding) list of symptoms.

Without a label for his disability, it is impossible to know what Lawrence's future holds. This uncertainty is frightening but it has also taught us to make hay while the sun shines.


Lawrence on the beach in Cornwall


Instead of dreaming of retiring to Cornwall, we recently upped sticks and moved there to a house by the sea. Lawrence likes to copy the sound of the seagulls and on sunny days, he enjoys nothing more than a good splash about in a rock pool.

His presence in our lives has brought those little family moments that can so easily go unnoticed into glorious technicolour. Lawrence managing to sit unaided after a year of daily practice, or his four-year-old sister Beatrice writing her name for the first time are our jump-for-joy moments.

Parenting a child with an undiagnosed syndrome can be tough. There are resources available for children with well-known disabilities like Down's syndrome or cerebral palsy, and guides for accessing services specific to them. But it is very hard to know where to fit in, when there is no well-trodden path to follow.

With no answers on the horizon, I searched online for families in the same situation. There are rather a lot of us as it happens. In fact, between 30 and 40% of children with additional needs have a SWAN - syndrome without a name.

I'm now a proud member of SWAN UK, the organisation supporting families with undiagnosed children here in Britain.

While our sons and daughters are all different, there is true strength in numbers and we celebrate the good times as well as supporting each other through the bad. Because we all understand that life is unpredictable with an undiagnosed child.

I am often asked how I manage to remain calm and positive while dealing with such huge uncertainty. The truth is that Lawrence makes it easy. His disabilities may affect every area of his development but his sense of humour button is firmly switched on. He has a divine sense of the ridiculous, he laughs when his sister is getting told off, he likes to "sing" along to 80s power ballads in the car and has a penchant for country music while being a budding percussionist himself. A curry lover and telly addict, in many ways he's growing up to be a pretty typical bloke.

In spite of his difficulties, top priority for Lawrence is getting on with the business of being a loud, messy, funny, two-year-old boy.

• Katherine Kowalski writes about life with Lawrence on her blog, Orange This Way.

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Publ.Date : Fri, 12 Apr 2013 15:49:16 +0000


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